Class Schedule / Descriptions

Fall Schedule 2017

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Summer Schedule 2017

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TLG Writing Classes
Running all year round, our weekly writing classes meet once a week for two hours a class. The writing classes entail plenty of reading as well to support the writing assigned, with the time in general split up to be about 60% writing and 40% reading. Students are regularly assessed on their writing skills.

— Writing Classes: Primary (P) – K-2nd

In our primary level classes, we help students lay a foundation for lifelong literacy. Our primary students build basic conventions in grammar, spelling, punctuation and expression through reading and writing on a regular basis. Genres of writing practiced include book reviews, autobiographical writing, simple narratives, letter writing, and opinion writing. Students at this level require and receive heavily guided and structured reading and writing but are also given some opportunities to write in free form to encourage creativity. In class group reading consists of short texts and structured retellings. Kindergarteners are encouraged to write at least 50 words per composition, 1st graders 100 words per composition, and 2nd graders 200 words per composition.

— Writing Classes: Elementary (E) – 3rd-4th
In our elementary level classes, we help students strengthen their foundation for a lifetime of reading and writing. Students’ basic conventions in grammar, spelling, punctuation and expression are being solidified through more challenging reading and writing. Students are encouraged and assigned guided and independent reading of both fiction and nonfiction with annotations. Genres of writing practiced include narrative writing, report writing, opinion essays, and literature response and analysis. Throughout each school year, an entire novel is read in class and thoroughly discussed, analyzed, and written about. Students in 3rd and 4th grade are encouraged to aim for 300 and 400 words per composition respectively.

— Writing Classes: Middle School (MS) – 5th-7th
For our middle school students, we are beginning to lay the groundwork for the demands of high school, college, and beyond. Students work on expanding their knowledge and expressions to begin developing more sophisticated styles in their writing. Independent and guided reading are assigned with annotations in both fiction and nonfiction texts. Genres of writing covered at this grade level expand to lengthier narrative writing, report writing, argumentative essays, and literature response and analysis. Throughout each school year, an entire novel is read in class and thoroughly discussed, analyzed, and written about. These students are required to write 500, 600, and 700 words for 5th, 6th, and 7th graders respectively.

— Writing Classes: High School Prep (HSP) – 7th-9th
Our high school preparation class starts to challenge students with the basics of advanced level high school writing, preparing for SAT, ACT, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB) tests. Students are encouraged to become more
sophisticated not just in their writing styles but in their critical thinking. Independent and guided reading in fiction and nonfiction continue to require annotations, but deeper comprehension and analysis are cultivated. Genres of writing studied in this class include personal statement autobiographical writing, argumentative synthesis essays, literature response and analysis essays, and rhetorical analysis essays. A college level textbook is used as the basic reading text of this course.

— Writing Classes: High School Workshop (HSW) – 9th-12th
Our high school workshop class is designed to accommodate the many demands our high school students face. Every class has a base assignment with topics developed based on what will be required on the AP, SAT, ACT, AP, and IB tests, but students are allowed to also work on and get assistance with school assigned writing, preparation for a specific writing tests such as the ones listed above, personal statements for program or college admissions, and even personal writing projects for publication. Genres of writing studied in this class include personal statement autobiographical writing, argumentative synthesis essays, literature response and analysis essays, and rhetorical analysis essays. A college level textbook is used as the basic reading text of this course.

— Writing Classes: Online High School Workshop (OHSW) – 9th-12th
Our online high school workshop class provides an online option for self-motivated students with busy schedules who require more flexibility. This course is individually tailored to the needs of each student in terms of college entrance writing tests (ACT, SAT, AP, IB, etc.), school assignments, personal statements, or creative projects. Each week, handwritten and typed compositions (maximum of 1000 words) are submitted electronically through email for feedback on Saturday evenings by 11:59pm. Office hours for more guided help from the teacher will be available Saturdays 4pm-6pm and Sundays 4pm-6pm or by appointment where the teacher will be available to answer student questions or provide guidance through text chat, video chat, phone calls, and emails.


TLG Reading Classes
Available all year round, our weekly reading classes meet once a week for two hours a class. Students receive their own copy of the class reading book to keep each session of class. Reading classes include writing based on the reading to help with comprehension and analysis of the text, with the time in general split up to be about 80% reading and 20% writing. Each term, the classes will have a thematic focus that will connect all the reading, challenging students to read a breadth of text with focus. Students are responsible for reading secondary sources and apply these sources as part of their written arguments. Students are responsible for a Research Paper at the end of term, to be worked on throughout the term with teacher guidance. Introduction and implementation of structured, active note-taking and reading, annotated bibliographies, MLA format and how to research topics effectively. Classes are designed to be primarily discussion based, wherein students will practice active critical thinking while providing textual evidence of claims to ground their arguments. Periodic debates between classmates will further deepen understanding of given topics and encourage students to begin building on their own independent arguments on challenging subjects whilst still grounding each claim with textual evidence.

— Shakespeare Literature Class (High School/High School Prep)
In order to provide a solid foundation for literature comprehension and analysis, our Shakespeare Literature Class for 7th-12th grade students will require students to read 5 Shakespeare plays per semester and write various essays, including a 2500 word research paper. This course will not only familiarize students with the far reaching works of this influential literary figure but also introduce to them larger, thematic ideas and guide them through deeper analytical thinking that will prepare them for high school level literary analysis essays in general and the AP English Literature and Composition test specifically.


TLG Summer Reading Program
During the summer, students have the opportunity to sign up for our summer reading program in which they read one book a week, attending class Monday through Friday. Students can sign up for the entire summer or one week at a time. Students receive and keep a copy of each book they sign up for, and throughout the week, they participate in group reading with the guidance of teachers in class and keep annotations in a journal. On the last day of class, students are required to write an essay or complete a project in which they utilize the book as a resource for their own composition. These reading classes are designed to encourage structured reading in the summer that will expand and develop student knowledge and reading skills and provide a strong foundation for growth in writing skills as well. The time in general split up to be about 80% reading and 20% writing.

— Summer Reading Program: Primary (P) – K-2nd
Primary level students are guided by teachers reading non-fiction books, taking annotations to improve analysis and comprehension, and writing a composition based on the text. As most students tend to read more narrative texts at younger ages, this early exposure to non-fiction texts builds a strong foundation of skills, knowledge, and reading and writing habits.

— Summer Reading Program: Elementary (E) – 3rd-5th
Through reading substantial and often award-winning non-fiction books, our elementary school level students will build new vocabulary and broad knowledge to assist with the often difficult jump between 3rd and 4th grade in text difficulty at school. This will also serve to lay the groundwork for challenging future non-fiction reading and the even more challenging jumps in text difficulty from elementary to middle school and middle school to high school.

— Summer Reading Program: Middle School (MS) – 5th-7th
Although this class is middle school level, they will be reading non-fiction texts at beginning high school level. These are often texts that can be independently read by the average high school student and cover a range of topics and world issues such as politics, history, science, philosophy, economics, and technology just to name a few. Books and topics read in this class solidify the important foundation on which to build the more advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that will be required at the advanced high school level.

— Summer Reading Program: High School 7th-12th
Texts chosen for our high school level classes are at the advanced high school and beginning college levels of difficulty. The literature reading courses focus on in-depth literary comprehension and analysis and are an excellent way to prepare for the AP English Literature test that is often taken in senior year of high school. The nonfiction reading course covers a large range of topics primarily in preparation for AP courses such as English, history, and other humanities courses. These books are often not easy for even advanced high school students to read on their own, and thus the teacher guidance, in-class discussions, and in-depth analysis and compositions required of students serves to support students as they expose themselves to these challenging texts.


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